Sunday

Sunday, September 30

Friday     |     Saturday     |     Sunday     |     Monday

 


New this Year!

Each Concurrent Session has been identified by a Focus Area and Audience Type.

Each learning objective now corresponds to the CAVS Body of Knowledge.


 
10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m
  • SG - Sunday General Session - Legislative and Political Update
11:00 a.m. - Noon
  • S1A - Supervising Interns and the ROI for your Program
  • S1B - Camp Prov - Removing Obstacles and Opening Doors
  • S1C - Year in the Life of a Volunteer Services Manager
  • S1D - SIZE DOESN’T MATTER: Big or Small Can Have It All!
  • S1E - Jesse Brown VAMC Food Pantry Program
  • S1F - Empathy & Connection: Improving Leadership & Volunteer Success
  • S1G - Re-Engaging Your Heart as a Leader of Volunteers
  • S1H - Partnering with Risk Management
1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
  • S2A - Who R UR Volunteers? Is that What You Want? Who Will They be?
  • S2B - ETC Elites: Bringing High School Students to Healthcare
  • S2C - Roles of Volunteer Engagement with Later-Life Transitions Among Hospital Volunteers
  • S2D - The Use of Color: Its Impact on us as People, Its Affect on us as Shoppers
  • S2E - Setting your Program up for Success: Strategic Planning Toolkit
  • S2F - Recovery Volunteers Impacting the Care of Substance Use Disorder Patients
  • S2G - Thriving Program Development: Designing and Developing Gold-Medal Volunteer Programs
  • S2H - Recognizing and Fighting Human Trafficking in a Healthcare Setting

Sunday, September 30
11:00 a.m. – Noon

 S1A - Supervising Interns and the ROI for your Program

Gabrielle Montoya, Project Specialist, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX

 

 

As our programs continue to grow and change, it is easy to get caught in the day-to-day minutiae. While we cannot always add an FTE to meet the increasing work demands, utilizing an unpaid intern is a great way to support our projects and goals forward. This program will help you get a process in place for utilizing semester interns. Presentation will be delivered utilizing examples and tested methods used by volunteer program at Houston Methodist Hospital, Texas Medical Center.

  • Explore the program benefits of having a semester student intern assist your team (A1)
  • Learn best practices, tools, and methods for supervising and maintaining interns, with any team size (F51)
  • Walk away with a toolbox of implementation strategies, which can be implemented immediately, including interviewing and selection, setting up projects goals, supervision tips and more. (A10)

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S1B - Camp Prov - Removing Obstacles and Opening Doors

Wendy Turner, CAVS, Volunteer Services Manager, Providence Regional Medical Center, Everett, WA

 

 

Camp Prov is an integrated day camp for children with special needs and their siblings, 2 – 10 years of age. There are six clinical staff, unit leaders, 400 campers, and 150 volunteers for the 5-week camp. Volunteers ages 14 and up are assigned to be a “buddy” with the campers. Activities include swimming, arts & crafts, sensory play, music, singing, story-telling, signing nature activities and dance & movement. This program can be implemented in a small setting, rural or urban.

  • Develop a plan and communicate what is needed to start a day camp (B11)
  • Define a process for recruiting and on-boarding volunteers for this unique program (C23)
  • Build a plan to effectively utilize volunteers as buddies. (D25)

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S1C - Year in the Life of a Volunteer Services Manager

Joe Thompson, Manager Volunteer Services, Norton Healthcare, Louisville, KY

 

 

Discuss the process of recruiting, onboarding, and training of volunteers. Role-playing interactions to illustrate interviewing, coaching, connecting, and if necessary terminating a volunteer. Taking the viewer step by step of our processes at Norton Healthcare both from the adult and children hospitals, and for both adult and teen volunteers, gain ideas and tools that you can take back and apply to your own organization.

  • Analyze recruitment, onboarding, and training of new volunteers (C24)
  • Discuss recognition of volunteers (G60)
  • Review how to cultivate relationships with hospital staff to create a culture of acceptance and utilization of volunteers. (E50)

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S1D - SIZE DOESN’T MATTER: Big or Small Can Have It All!

Janene Riedeman, CAVS, Director, Volunteer Services, St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, MN
Deb Anderson, Supervisor Volunteer and Guest Services, Gift Shop Manager, Essentia Health, St. Cloud, MN

 

 

You’ll have fun while you learn! These two speakers challenge each other and may even disagree at times, but they have learned from one another and will share the best successes and most valuable failures. From fiscal management to gift shop staffing, to marketing tactics and sales promotions, there will be something for every size shop to learn.

  • Identify measurements/targets that will help your gift shop achieve greater financial success (E47)
  • Learn about sales and marketing tactics that have proven success in gift shops large and small (E48)
  • Practice effective sales techniques to use in your gift shop. (E46)

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S1E - Jesse Brown VAMC Food Pantry Program

Patrick Gleason, Chief, Voluntary Services, Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Chicago, IL

The Jesse Brown Veterans Food Pantry, which launched in November 2013, is a partnership between the Greater Chicago Food Depository, AmeriCorps, and the Jesse Brown VAMC. The pantry is one of the first programs of its kind offering Veterans a "Client Choice" model pantry. Client choice is a model of food distribution that enables Veterans to select their own food, much like a grocery store. Unlike most pantries, which provide clients with fixed boxes or bags of food with no ability to select the items included, client choice pantries allow clients the ability to choose from a wide variety of foods, better enabling clients to meet their personal dietary needs. Client choice also ensures a sense of dignity for clients and their families, higher satisfaction with the food they are able to choose, less waste, and greater opportunities for volunteers and clients to interact with the mission and vision of the organization in mind.

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S1F -  Empathy & Connection: Improving Leadership & Volunteer Success

Chris Perez, MS, Patient Experience Manager, Atrium Health, Charlotte, NC

 

 

Patients enter the healthcare system with many fears and anxieties about things like costs and courtesy. A volunteer program can be successful at meeting the deeper needs of a patient by understanding the concepts of empathy and human connection. Through interactive exercises and study review, this presentation will empower learners to weave empathy into the fabric of their volunteer program.

  • Define and understand concepts of empathy and human connection (F53)
  • Identify and understand what patients value in today’s new era of healthcare and how volunteers can meet those needs (C30)
  • Learn how to lead with empathy and develop a volunteer program with empathy as a core concept. (F55)

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S1G - Re-Engaging Your Heart as a Leader of Volunteers

Amy Sanders, CAVS, Manager of Volunteer & Guest Services, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

 

 

We came to healthcare because we care.  Those who flourish, even in a broken system, are those who choose to love their work, express gratitude, perform small acts of kindness and have self-compassion. Inspired by “A Time to Care”, we will:

  • Introduce simple but life changing concepts about compassionate care (D35)
  • Explore ways to bring meaning, joy and purpose back to your work (F55)
  • Identify simple yet powerful tactics we can use and teach others that create healing connections within minutes-reducing blood pressure, heart rate, reduce stress and strengthen the immune response. (D36)

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S1H - Partnering with Risk Management

Fran Charney, RN, MS, CPHRM, CPHQ, CPPS, CPSO, DFASHRM, Director of Risk Management, American Society for Healthcare Risk Management (ASHRM), Chicago, IL

 

 

Everyone plays a role in risk management. This presentation will identify current or future volunteer opportunities. Four real-life healthcare scenarios will be discussed and the risks associated with these probable situations will be identified and discussed. Audience participation is strongly encouraged as this will be an interactive session with open dialogue.

  • Explore possible expanding volunteer roles in healthcare (D36)
  • Identify the risks associated with the expanding volunteer role (F52)
  • Describe the value of working together through different lens (B16)

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Sunday, September 3
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.


S2A - Who R UR Volunteers? Is that What You Want? Who Will They be?

Frank Hrabe, Database & Compliance Coordinator, Children's of Alabama, Birmingham, AL

 

 

Discuss the importance of knowing your volunteers and knowing if they match your hospital needs. The prime focus will look to the future, in a discussion of who will be our volunteers and are we ready to meet their demands. Is the current model of service out of date? What could it look like and would that work for you? This will include information about the differences in generations and to incorporate that into a strategic plan. Review who your volunteers are and if you are satisfied with who they are. Attention will focus on who will be your volunteers because of changing demographics.

  • Participate in a discussion of who will be our volunteers in the present and future (B16)
  • Gain a deeper appreciation for marketing and strategic planning as they relate to volunteers (A1)
  • Analyze who really are our volunteers and what characteristics do we want to best utilize their skills. (C21)

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S2B - ETC Elites: Bringing High School Students to Healthcare

Nancy Williams, CAVS, Director, Volunteer Services and Community Outreach, Piedmont Columbus Regional, Columbus, GA
Molly T. McVey, Manager, Volunteer Services, Piedmont Columbus Regional, Columbus, GA

 

 

Gain how you can provide the information necessary to establish “Elite” programs in emergency departments to your organization. Learn how to achieve buy-in from clinical staff and the steps necessary to appropriately onboard students. Research data from 2014-2017 will be shared that include quantified results.

  • Implement best practices in Youth Volunteer onboarding in an Emergency Trauma Center (ETC) (C29)
  • Acquire techniques for achieving “buy-in” from clinical staff in this specialized volunteer role (F51)
  • Gain the tools necessary to implement the program at their own facility. (A10)

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S2C - Roles of Volunteer Engagement with Later-Life Transitions Among Hospital Volunteers

Melissa Heinlein Storti, PhD, CAVS, Chief, Voluntary Service, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA
Allison Russell, Doctoral Student, University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practice, Philadelphia, PA

 

 

This session will not only provide evidence for what volunteer administrators are encountering and contemplating about their work with older adult volunteers but also connect these insights with the experiences of older adult volunteers themselves, with a specific focus on their plans for future volunteer engagement and attitudes about volunteer retirement.

  • Discuss the unique challenges of working with older adult volunteers and gain tools to overcome these challenges (F52)
  • Analyze the process by which older adult volunteers decide to end or “retire” from their volunteering, and how this decision impacts not only the organization but also the well-being of the volunteers (F59)
  • Review data collected from volunteer resource managers and discuss the implications for policy development to assist in the transitioning of older adult volunteers. (A5)

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S2D - The Use of Color: Its Impact on us as People, Its Affect on us as Shoppers

Gene Collovecchio, Manager, Retail Operations, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH

 

 

Covers the use of color and its effects on the customer who visit and shop in our retail environments. Other topics covered are the psychological value of colors and how they impact the general mood of the store and customer purchases. In addition, the importance of the use of color and color combinations in merchandise display will be discussed.

  • Understanding the importance of the use of color in a retail environment (A3)
  • Learn the impact of color selection on the buyer (B19)
  • Analyze the affect that each color actually has on the customer. (B11)

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S2E - Setting your Program up for Success: Strategic Planning Toolkit

Mandy Guest, CAVS, Director, Volunteer Services and Gift Shop, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX

 

 

Learn the three components of increasing the value and quality outputs of your volunteer program, through the utilization of strategic planning. By becoming intentional with our goal setting, we can increase our reach, with direct and targeted goals. Utilizing examples and tested methods used by our volunteer program at Houston Methodist Hospital, located in the Texas Medical Center.

  • Create an annual strategic planning and learn to create a departmental dashboard of goals and metrics for the year (A4)
  • Determine valuable volunteer projects for your department, utilizing project forms to develop your strategic blueprint for the year (A7)
  • Provide operational tools to increase productivity for employees (dashboards, WIGS, Limited Interruption Days, Lessons Learned forms, Stay the Course check ins, and more). (E47)

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S2F - Recovery Volunteers Impacting the Care of Substance Use Disorder Patients

Lynelle Abel, CAVS, System Director, Volunteer and Guest Services, Yale New Haven Health, New Haven, CT
Deirdre Doyle, Patient Service Manager, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT
Marie Tartnyek, Substance Abuse Specialist, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT

 

 

Cover how sharing data, through various teaching methods, on how the healthcare industry is impacted by the disease of addiction, metrics illustrating how the program impacts re-admission rates, a roadmap on how to start a recovery program from the ground up as well as an outline of educational workshops presented to clinicians to build in-patient referrals.

  • Understand how to build a Recovery Volunteer Program (from recruitment, retention, and creating stakeholders) (A3)
  • Learn how to use internal tools (EMR, data collection, tracking rate of re-admission, etc.) to demonstrate value of Recovery Volunteer program (E47)
  • Identify the 12-step Substance Abuse recovery models that can be shared at the patient bedside as well as how to start an AA/NA meeting on an in-patient unit. (B16)

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S2G - Thriving Program Development: Designing and Developing Gold-Medal Volunteer Programs

Leslie Amani, MBA, Spiritual Care and Volunteer Coordinator, Enloe Medical Center, Chico, CA

 

 

Research defines, "thriving" as vitality and learning, combined.  Participants will engage in directed designing and planning of programs that will engage their volunteer populations. Essential questions: What is our role, our mission, and our vision?  Case studies of industry leaders in volunteerism will be used to highlight volunteer job designs that are sustainable with thriving volunteers.  Programs that have dissolved will also be reviewed.  Iterative feedback, that is relevant to specific volunteer populations, will be developed through Think-Pair-Share strategies and will be practiced amongst attendees. This session is relevant to organizations of any size and geographical location.

  • Design and analyze a volunteer service description, including shadowing, for placement and volunteer training (C22)
  • Brainstorm and develop educational opportunities for volunteers’ professional development (F53)
  • Strategize tools to minimize incivility in their organization through listening and response techniques, and practice iterative feedback to direct organizational goals and job performance information to their volunteers. (F56)

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S2H - Recognizing and Fighting Human Trafficking in a Healthcare Setting

Julia Geynisman-Tan, Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery Fellow, Northwestern Medicine, Chicago, IL

In this 60-minute session we will review the ways in which human trafficking survivors present themselves to healthcare, the ways in which the healthcare system can help identify and treat survivors and the role of all hospital team members in creating safe spaces for trafficking survivors.

  • Understand the definition and the risk factors for human trafficking (A1)
  • Understand the complaints with which human trafficking survivors can present to a healthcare setting (A3)
  • Learn how to identify red flags of trafficking and how to escalate your concerns to the appropriate team members (F55)

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